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bonsai poinsettias

Posted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 4:41 am
by Sym
Of course I am new here and I am always trying new things.
I got notion to get some of the the left over poinsettias from church this year (after holiday season) and I was trying to do some propagation from cuttings.
As I was researching and getting my information together for that I got the notion to try a bonsai poinsettia..
Wondering if anyone has tried this and has anyone had any success?
This should be fun!!!!

Posted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 5:11 am
by rainbowgardener
Other people have tried it:

Image

photo credit: https://www.naryves.com/pj/garden/poinsettia.shtml

I didn't find any images that looked very successful as bonsai, to me. As in the image above, the leaves are way over sized in proportion to the plant. It doesn't really give the image of a tree or of age, which is what bonsai is usually going for. Just a poinsettia in a small pot.

Posted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 5:41 am
by koiboy01
Hi,
Definition of Bonsai is a tree in a pot, you are never going to get a ponsietta to look like a tree, as rainbow says for one thing the leaves are far to large,but you can still have fun trying.
koiboy01

Posted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 5:57 am
by Sym
You know that makes a lot of sense.. Definitely don't see the leaves getting any smaller. Does it even develop a woody trunk with age?

Posted: Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:14 am
by manofthetrees
Definition of Bonsai is a tree in a pot, you are never going to get a ponsietta to look like a tree, as rainbow says for one thing the leaves are far to large,but you can still have fun trying.
this is not true the stems harden off and turn a light brown and get a flakey appierance the leaves can be reduced also . a freind has one at work and has been growing it for over 10 years .she kept it smalll and it looks amazing . as for the definition "tree in pot" this is not taken litterally or my lilac and wisteira would not be bonsai

Posted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 5:26 am
by koiboy01
Hi,
and why would you lilac and wisteria not be bonsai.
koiboy01

Posted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 7:34 am
by tomc
koiboy01 wrote:Hi,
and why would you lilac and wisteria not be bonsai.
koiboy01
I'm not sure why lilac and wisteria are off-list as bonsai.

Both adapt well to shallow pots, and meet the standard of a woody plant.

A-n-d have been repeatedly trained as bonsai. as have bitter-sweet and ivy...

A number of succulents (like jade or christmas cactus) have been trained as bonsai. They might not muster up enough of a woody stem, but their care keeps growers busy.

Posted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 9:41 am
by Gnome
Tom,

You have mentioned Bittersweet several times in recent months. This is a plant that I have taken an interest in but don't recall seeing much information on them regarding bonsai culture. Care to elaborate? Perhaps in a new thread.

Norm

Posted: Fri Jan 18, 2013 8:39 am
by tomc
Gnome wrote:Tom,

You have mentioned Bittersweet several times in recent months. This is a plant that I have taken an interest in but don't recall seeing much information on them regarding bonsai culture. Care to elaborate? Perhaps in a new thread.

Norm
Both english ivy and bittersweet are probably classified as invasive, and may even be on the noxious weed hit list.

If they have a virtue as bonsai it is once staked up right the stem gets woody enough to support the plant tree-fashion. Virginia creeper leaves don't reduce, the other two do.

New growers seem to be perpetually in search of stock to collect (for free) these two that I have featured have enough good qualities to be starter plants, and need pruning on a regular basis, so they noticably grow.

And have the potential to regrow a bad trim. Beside being vital as a glutton (wolverine) in the woods.

Because they are invasive, nobody is "protecting" them, and most property holders will permit collection. Their north country cousin are larch, which will volunteer in any northern VT NH ME ditch.

Practice on the poorer country cousins. Buy better stock once you've kept a weed alive for a while.

Posted: Fri Jan 18, 2013 4:51 pm
by Gnome
Tom,

Thanks for the information. I have a collected specimen of Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus, orbiculatus) but it is only about an inch in diameter. I suppose that it will have to go back in the ground after I get a decent root system established. Do you, by any chance, know of a way to differentiate between males and females?

Norm

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:31 am
by manofthetrees
and why would you lilac and wisteria not be bonsai.
I was proving a point. bonsai does not have to be a "tree" lilacs are shrubs and wisteria are vines pointsettia can be bonsai