sailfins
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soil recipe

Can anyone give me a link to a soil recipe?Or recomend a mixture

rjj
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Re: soil recipe

sailfins wrote:Can anyone give me a link to a soil recipe?Or recomend a mixture
Hi

You can ask 100 people what they use ratio and component wise and get 100 different answers. A lot will depend on what's available, your growing conditions, and care and growing techniques you use. Ultimately it will be what you like to use. :D It might take you ten years to get there though.


All that's really important is a porous mix that freely drains and allows air to move through the mix. Ideally a soaking wet mix will fall apart after queezed into a ball in your hand.


I use one part Metro Mix 702 soil mix
2 parts composted fine pine soil conditioner
2 parts turface

I'll let others provide the numerous links you see on many of the other threads in the Bonsai forum.

Good luck!

randy

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Sailfins,
A lot will depend on what's available,
A very astute observation by Randy there. The finest ingredients known are of little use to you if you are unable or unwilling to go to the expense of locating them. The first step will be to locate a good source of in-organic material.

I excerpted this from a previous post of mine:
1. Turface MVP, is is fired clay product that is intended primarily for sports applications but is ideal for use with bonsai. The 'MVP' moniker simply designates the grade/size of the product. The parent company of this product, distributes various products under various names. Many of which have been used as bonsai components.

2. Haydite, is an expanded shale material. I believe its intended application is for construction and is available in various grades as well.

3. Lava rock, the familiar material that is seen as a landscape product in almost any home center/box store. The problem is locating it in the proper size. I have read that some have located the proper size locally but I never have. I am limited to either buying by mail order, something I try to avoid for obvious reasons, or sizing it myself.

4. Perlite, an expanded mineral that resembles Styrofoam beads is available everywhere and is effective if not particularly attractive.

I have used all of these products at one time or another. May I suggest that others look into these components before going to the expense of shipping in expensive imported soil components such as Akadama or Kanuma. Many growers do just fine with local products that can be obtained in bulk at much less expense. By the way all of these materials need to be sieved to remove the fines that should not be included in your soil.
Also make sure you read the sticky threads at the top of the bonsai forum page that concern soils, re-potting and nebari formation.

Also look to these pages for more information about growing mediums.
[url]https://www.memobug.com/csn/csn.cgi?database=ronmartin%2edb&command=viewone&id=9&rnd=960.5995123805917[/url]
[url]https://www.evergreengardenworks.com/soils.htm[/url]

Norm

BaronOsiris
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I don't mean to hijack your post sailfins :| but I am very interested in this same question.

I have read a lot on this subject and still am not quite sure where to start. I was hoping someone would give a few examples or recipes they use. Then I could start from there adjusting and experimenting. Here are a few specific questions I have.

Where do you find Turface? I was just at a very large garden center today and they don't carry it. They hadn't even heard of it.

Where do you find Haydite?

What is the proper size of lava rock for using in a potting mixture?

I saw bags of orchid bark today. Looks like it's a mixture of different barks the label does not specify what types. The pieces were about the size of large pea rocks. Would this be acceptable to use as organics?

ynot
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I don't mean to hijack your post sailfins :| but I am very interested in this same question.

I have read a lot on this subject and still am not quite sure where to start. I was hoping someone would give a few examples or recipes they use. Then I could start from there adjusting and experimenting. Here are a few specific questions I have.
This is a complex question that I do not have time to address at the moment, Do check the stickys Gnome mentioned as there is a link to an onsite thread that discusses the benefits and properties of well draining soil.
Where do you find Turface? I was just at a very large garden center today and they don't carry it. They hadn't even heard of it.

Where do you find Haydite?
Both of these products are made by a company called [url=https://www.turface.com/sports_fields/index.cfm?bhcp=1]Profile[/url][As well as Schultz Aqua Soil- Which is used in water gardens [Easy to find at the big box:)] and is essentially turface {It is Arcilite}in a slightly smaller particle size. I have used this for years and I like it.]

Profile has an 800# on the site which can direct you to your nearest dealer of Turface [IE].
What is the proper size of lava rock for using in a potting mixture?
The same as your other components, Your soil should optimally be of a fairly similar particle texture size [But it will vary- Know this;)]. The actual dimensions of the particles have more to do with the size tree your potting.

I personally do not use anything SMALLER than 1/8 of an inch [Sifted to remove anything that small.] and you may notice that [Barring sand] the same size is the smallest size sold for I/O medium [url=https://www.dallasbonsai.com/store/akadama.html]here.[/url]
I saw bags of orchid bark today. Looks like it's a mixture of different barks the label does not specify what types. The pieces were about the size of large pea rocks. Would this be acceptable to use as organics?
Again, Depends on what your using it on. You could always smash/crush/grind it up a bit and then sift it to get the usable bits.

Good questions:)

ynot

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Baron,

[url=https://www.profileproducts.com/sports_fields/index.cfm?lp=gb&bhcp=1]Turface MVP[/url]
[url=https://www.hpbhaydite.com/Haydite_Soil_Amendments.htm]Haydite[/url]

Both sites have phone numbers.

How much do you need to make? If you only need enough for a few trees and don't mind a little added expense I can direct you to an on-line retailer for Turface. You can also purchase ready made mix if all you need is a small amount.

As far as recipes go, as has been noted, there is no one magic bullet but I'll try to give you a few tips. Most Conifers like a leaner mix than deciduous trees. 100% in-organic in not uncommon for Pines for instance. Deciduous trees do well with some organic matter (bark) perhaps 15-20%. Tropicals, like Ficus, can do well with an even higher percentage of organics.

Consider your climate and how often you are able to water. A hot, dry climate with infrequent watering will require a more water retentive mix, both particle size and composition play roles in this. If you are in a cooler, moister location or are able and willing to put the extra effort into watering more frequently then you can use a freer draining mix. You probably fall somewhere in between these two extremes.

Norm

rjj
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Although it's not a regular stock item, my local feed store brings Turface MVP in for me. On occasion I'll order 10 bags at a time to get the price down. I grow a lot of Adeniums and go through it pretty quick during the growing season.

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