sandman
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Location: hilmar california

slab planting and what type of soil would be used

not to sure what kind of soil i would use to plant and oak forest on a slate slab i don't think i would want to use akadama as it would prolly just fall apart any recommendation would be greatly appreciated also im in zone 9 i believe
thanks for your help

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Gnome
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Sandman,

Although I have never created a slab planting, unless I am very much mistaken, the idea is to use peat muck in order to build shallow wall around the perimeter of the slab. This, in effect, turns the slab into a shallow pot. I am in the process of doing a little research for you, so stay tuned.

Norm

ynot
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Muck it is!:)

I have not done one either...Yet.

Some people make their own [Many recipes abound ] I will try to find a few for you.

If all else fails:

You can also buy it [url=https://www.bonsailearningcenter.com/olstore/index.html]here.[/url]

EDIT: For some reason it will not link direct...So, follow the link and then click:
'Soil & Supplies', Scroll down to 'Bonsai Super Muck'...

ynot

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Gnome
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Sandman,

Some quick research seems to indicate that muck is generally comprised of roughly 50/50 chopped sphagnum peat moss and heavy clay. One recipe suggest mixing it with water to a soupy consistency and allowing it stand for a month. Stir it every few days never allowing it to dry out. So you may want to start soon.

Don't forget to provide drainage either through holes in the slab or through tilting the slab after watering. You may also need to provide some anchor points to attach the trees to a shallow slab. Twisted Copper wires can be secured to the slab either by using lead spit shots or Epoxy.

Norm

sandman
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ok how would i make wholes in the slab for drainage ? , i was thinking of a drill and a concrete bit but the slab i have is pretty thin and i think it might crack it . and so i just build a little wall around where i want to have the plants and thats it . and say i was going to put it on a slant could i just poke a few holes were it would drain or would it wash away the wall?
thank again for all the info this is the best forum ever
jacob

ynot
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Jacob,
Your welcome,

Gnome is right on WRT the recipe for muck.
ok how would I make wholes in the slab for drainage ? , I was thinking of a drill and a concrete bit but the slab I have is pretty thin and I think it might crack it .
One thing: Will the thickness of the slab support the weight of the tree[s] and soil [especially when watered] that you intend to put upon it without cracking?

This is something to consider as you will have to move it on occasion.
nd so I just build a little wall around where I want to have the plants and thats it . and say I was going to put it on a slant could I just poke a few holes were it would drain or would it wash away the wall?
I am not sure that it would drain with enough effectiveness that way..

It does need some form of drainage capability so this is an issue to address....hmmm.

Still thinking...

ynot

sandman
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id say the slab ranges from 3/4 of an inch to 1 1/4 maybe even 1 1/2 inches thick. i do think it will hold the weight but not sure if a drill would be a good idea .maybe ill just keep it wet while i drill and go very slow and use a bunch of smaller holes as opposed to a couple larger ones but other than a drill i have no idea how to put holes in it
thanks again

sandman
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Location: hilmar california

oh and the slab is about 2 1/2 ft x 1 1/2 ft roughly so it would be maybe 5-7 smaller trees and they would be coastal live oaks if that makes a differance and maybe a bigger rock mounted (mountain) to it with some moss or a very small tree on top or side
thanks again
lot of stuff to consider i didnt think there would be this much involved

ynot
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sandman wrote:oh and the slab is about 2 1/2 ft x 1 1/2 ft roughly so it would be maybe 5-7 smaller trees and they would be coastal live oaks if that makes a differance and maybe a bigger rock mounted (mountain) to it with some moss or a very small tree on top or side
thanks again
lot of stuff to consider I didnt think there would be this much involved
The slab alone sounds pretty heavy, NOt to mention the mountain. I have a slate wall clock about 8 feet from me and my parents house is sided in it so I know how heavy it is...lol

Lots of what you see wrt slabs are not stone at all but they are resin and simply look that way.

:Excuse me just a moment sandman:

Gnome :!: Please refresh my memory, What is the name of that product that you are going to build a slab out of? [I am having an attack of 'Sometimers' and I cannot recall....:roll::lol:]

:ok:

Btw, Since you seem to enjoy Penjing, Are you familiar with Qingquan Zhao? [Google image him] He is amazing:

[img]https://img109.imageshack.us/img109/8658/chineseelm2qingquanzhaory6.jpg[/img]


This planting is four feet wide and three feet tall BTW.

I apologize for the drool on your keyboard..:razz: ;):lol:, I thought you might like that though.

ynot

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Gnome
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Ynot,
Gnome Please refresh my memory, What is the name of that product that you are going to build a slab out of? [I am having an attack of 'Sometimers' and I cannot recall....]
I believe that you are referring to hypertufa. [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertufa]Here[/url] is a link that briefly describes it. Google returns over 100K hits so there is a lot of information out there.

Sandman,

Unless you have your heart set on the slab you have, consider making one yourself. You can incorporate feet and drainage holes in it as you make it. I have a very detailed article in one of my books but I cannot locate it right now, I'll keep looking.

Norm

ynot
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I believe that you are referring to hypertufa. [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertufa]Here[/url] is a link that briefly describes it. Google returns over 100K hits so there is a lot of information out there.
Yes! Thank you, I just could not recall the name of it for anything.

Sandman,
Unless you have your heart set on the slab you have, consider making one yourself. You can incorporate feet and drainage holes in it as you make it.
I quite agree with this, You could also IE use the hypertufa to form a duplicate to your rock/mountain [Perhaps it would be possible to make a mold and duplicate it even.]

I have seen online a pictorial about making a slab [...Somewhere] I will try to find it for you.

ynot

sandman
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Location: hilmar california

ya your probably right about it being heavy it prolly weighs like 30-35lbs with nothing on it so add another 20-40 lbs plus the weird shape and u have got your hands full. ill do somemore research before i do anything. btw that picture is awesome. what is that on i kinda like that look nice and simple so u can dress up the trees and water feature.
thanks again for all the help it is greatly appreciated
jacob

ynot
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sandman wrote:ya your probably right about it being heavy it prolly weighs like 30-35lbs with nothing on it so add another 20-40 lbs plus the weird shape and u have got your hands full. ill do somemore research before I do anything.
Heavy! No doubt..Excellent, I love to hear about people doing research...:lol:
btw that picture is awesome. what is that on I kinda like that look nice and simple so u can dress up the trees and water feature.
Awesome indeed! That looks to me to be a slab on top of a [url=https://www.google.com/search?q=suiban&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a]suiban.[/url] Which is a shallow tray with no drainage holes in it.
[Notice in the picture that the horse is 'drinking' out of standing water.] It looks to me as though the slab is situated slightly above the water though.
thanks again for all the help it is greatly appreciated
jacob
Your welcome. 8)

ynot



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