gbhunter77
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Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 4:54 am
Location: Michigan

pots

Is there a point to buying Tokame or Yixing pots? These things are terribly expensive and they look like some of the cheaper pots. Was just curious about the opinion of some senior folks here.

TomM
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Location: Cedarville (SE of Utica) NY, USA

I'm a senior. It's a matter of individual taste and pride of ownership. For me personally I would not bother. I go to club sales and look for pots that I like and think are appropriate for my trees. They may be used left-overs for a few bucks or in the $100-$200 range by potters I know.

There are folks who want the very best or most rare. That's OK if they have the $$$ and want to show tree in the top exhibits. Or not!!

Just like owning a Picasso or a very expensive car. It's not for everybody. It's what you like and, to your eye, is right for you, your tree - and your budget. No need to impress others.

tomc
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When I don't find orphan pots (on the cheap), and do need new pots, mostly I end up buying korean mica pots.

Not for their great artistry, but for their bounce-ability.

If you exhibit your trees, buy the best you can find. if your bench is on display for just about yourself, buy what has the best utility.

Thats my story, and I'm sticking to it.
Think like a tree
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Gnome
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Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2006 4:17 am
Location: Western PA USDA Zone 6A

gbhunter77,

If you are just starting out you may not even need to make this decision right now. Many of my trees are in training pots at this time. Trees in development are often hindered when placed into bonsai pots. Truly fine bonsai are not moved to bonsai pots for years or perhaps even decades.

If you really want to have a younger, less developed tree in a nice pot choose one that is a little on the big side, this allows the roots some room to grow while pleasing your aesthetic side. Be careful though about leaving inexpensive pots to overwinter outside in your climate, they may not hold up well.

Norm

kdodds
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Ditto Norm. If you're just starting and don't have anything worth potting, wait until the tree is developed and you know what kind of pot you want. With that said, there are A LOT of custom potters out there (Iker, Erin, Remington) whose products are A LOT more interesting and of very high quality for a fraction of the price of Tokoname. For my money, high priced Asian pots are ridiculous, and I often see trees in them and shrug. Yeah, they're pretty. But so what, other pots are just as pretty. Why pay 3, 4, or 5 times the price? Unless, of course, you like throwing your money away.

LostHand
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Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 3:44 pm

kdodds wrote:With that said, there are A LOT of custom potters out there (Iker, Erin, Remington) whose products are A LOT more interesting and of very high quality for a fraction of the price of Tokoname. For my money, high priced Asian pots are ridiculous, and I often see trees in them and shrug.
Agree. If we speak about "price-quality" relation Asian pots are not the best choice.
Last edited by LostHand on Tue Nov 15, 2011 3:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Wayne the Shrink
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Location: Hampton Roads, Virginia

Have you seen bonsai displays in any place but museums? I have absolutely no experience growing but have seen professional displays in wooden boxes I could build in my garage. I have seen them in beautiful pots. I have seen them in pots that I could have made, and all of them are professional displays.

I would endorse the first response. Remember that the focus is the tree, not the pot. The pot comes well after the tree.
There is no 'right' that requires me to work for you or you to work for me. This is slavery.

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