Green
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Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Sterling, Illinois

What is Best Way to Water & Care: Cascade Style Juniper?

I just got a cascade style juniper. It is very healthy, but the soil seems dry. I checked the soil through the top and through the bottom drain holes with a toothpick and it came out dry. I have soaked the soil and put it on my back deck with my other trees.

This is my first cascade style. Is there a difference in how you care for or water a cascade style juniper? It has a tall pot, about 8 inches.

Also, we have well water. Is it okay to use that for watering or should I use something else?
85 miles west of Chicago
Zone 5a

TomM
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Location: Cedarville (SE of Utica) NY, USA

I don't do anything different with cascades. When watering do a good slow soak. That means be sure that it is fully moistened and runs through the drain holes freely. It is good to water in 2 (or even 3) stages, a few minutes apart. Then allow to dry out some between waterings.

I find that spraying or heavy misting just before watering helps to make the water soak in better and more quickly.

You say that the juni is very healthy. It does like to go dry a little more than some species.

Well water is fine - rain water is even better.

Tom

Green
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Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Sterling, Illinois

Thank you very much Tom for your help. I have killed 2 junipers previously. I am going to be more cautious with this one. I think with those two I didn't water them enough. Both of them went at least once with the soil completely dried out.

Is the toothick a good way to check my cascade juniper, or is there a better indicator for what to check to know it is a good time to water it?
Another thing I was wondering. There is one other common denominator if it is not insufficient watering that killed them. Both of them started turning brown shortly after spring. In fact the second one is one that I am losing right now. I keep them in my garage during the coldest months of winter because it gets pretty bad sometimes. Is it possible that the way I put them into hybernation or water them in the winter could be the problem? As far as watering during the winter, I cover the soil with leaves and put snow on top of it. When it thaws enough to melt the snow is when it gets watered. Then I wait a little bit and put more snow on.

My apologies for all the questions. I just want to be very thourough with this one. It is a pretty special tree and I haven't had the best of luck with Junipers.
85 miles west of Chicago
Zone 5a

TomM
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Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 12:28 pm
Location: Cedarville (SE of Utica) NY, USA

To be honest I am not an expert with juniper and have lost a few also. I am currently experiencing a problem with one that I re-potted in Spring. But generally speaking it sounds like you are following the correct procedures for overwinter protection and watering. Sometimes they do not survive.

Rather than a toothpick for a tall cascade you might try a long thin wooden skewer.

I'm hoping that others who know their junipers will add their insight.

kdodds
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Location: Airmont, NY Zone 6/7

Not so much with Junipers directly, but with pots in general:

Shallower pots need watering more often than deeper pots. That seems self-evident enough, right? But there seems to be a breaking point in there. Semi cascade pots are the most like traditional houseplant planters in proportion and seem to hold moisture best. Full traditional cascades do, in my experience, dry and drain more quickly than pots used for other styles. Why this should be the case I do not know but I suspect it has more to do with the tree's roots and how deep they go and how effecient they are at absorbing moisture than it has to do with the pot proportions.

Green
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Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Sterling, Illinois

Here are some pics of the trees I mentioned.
First here is the Juniper that I might have killed. I haven't given up on it yet. I still see some green areas but it has been browning and loosing needles
[url=https://img716.imageshack.us/i/bonsaibrowningjuniper2.jpg/][img]https://img716.imageshack.us/img716/2474/bonsaibrowningjuniper2.th.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://img202.imageshack.us/i/bonsaibrowningjuniper1.jpg/][img]https://img202.imageshack.us/img202/6566/bonsaibrowningjuniper1.th.jpg[/img][/url]


Here are a few pics of the cascade japanese juniper:

[url=https://img24.imageshack.us/i/bonsaicascadecloseupljp.jpg/][img]https://img24.imageshack.us/img24/6139/bonsaicascadecloseupljp.th.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://img830.imageshack.us/i/cascadetop.jpg/][img]https://img830.imageshack.us/img830/260/cascadetop.th.jpg[/img][/url]

Here is my collection:

[url=https://img545.imageshack.us/i/bonsaicollection.jpg/][img]https://img545.imageshack.us/img545/4840/bonsaicollection.th.jpg[/img][/url]
Far Left: Japanese Hornbeam
Below Hornbeam: Baby jade
Right of Hornbeam: Cascade style Jap. Juniper & dying Juniper
Right of Junipers: Ginseng Ficus(my first tree)
Right of Ficus on chair: Jap. maple
85 miles west of Chicago
Zone 5a

Green
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Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Sterling, Illinois

Here is another pic. of my Japanese Hornbeam.

[url=https://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/163/bonsaijaphornbeam.jpg/][img]https://img163.imageshack.us/img163/5417/bonsaijaphornbeam.th.jpg[/img][/url]

Uploaded with [url=https://imageshack.us]ImageShack.us[/url]


It is pretty thin on the bottom branches, just not filling out. No problem towards the top. The middle branches seem to be filling out better and getting longer. Any suggestions?
85 miles west of Chicago
Zone 5a

Green
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Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Sterling, Illinois

What would cause my miniature Jade to lose leaves. I have about 8 leaves in one day in the soil
85 miles west of Chicago
Zone 5a

kdodds
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Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 12:07 am
Location: Airmont, NY Zone 6/7

Usually, leaf loss in a Jade is from overwatering/watering too frequently. OR, if it is a new tree, and this is pretty prevalent this year, it may be a clipping that has not completely rooted and therefore showing symptoms of "root rot".

Green
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Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Sterling, Illinois

[url=https://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/703/bonsaijade.jpg/][img]https://img703.imageshack.us/img703/8284/bonsaijade.jpg[/img][/url]

Here is a picture of the tree and leaves lost. I did get this tree about 2-3 weeks ago and repotted it when I got it. The soil was Bone dry when I picked it up. It did seem healthy then. It looks healthy now too but it is dropping leaves.

Could this be from the stress of repotting? I have only watered it once since I repotted it. It took about 10 days for the soil to dry from repotting. I do spray the leaves every day. How dry should I let the soil be? How long should I let the soil be dry might be the better question.

thanks for your help
85 miles west of Chicago
Zone 5a

kdodds
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Posts: 1436
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 12:07 am
Location: Airmont, NY Zone 6/7

Did you do any root pruning (intentional or otherwise) when repotting? If so, remember the old tenet, "as above, so below". If you don't also prune up top and/or defoliate, the tree will do it for you. It's generally healthier for the tree, and quicker in recovery, if you help it out.

Green
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Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Sterling, Illinois

I did not even think of that kdodds. Thanks for the tip. I did hear that before but forgot. I have a few branches I would like to remove so maybe that would help. Thanks for your help.

Any Juniper experts out there? Not sure about the one in question above. Is it even worth trying to save? I have been misting it once a day. I read my bonsai book where they water their trees once or even twice a day during the growth season. I have always been told that is a no no and not to over water. It seems like my trees go several days or even longer than a week before the soil seems to be ready for me to water the tree. I don't let it go completely dry but the soil still seems very moist days after watering. What is the best practice? Here is the picture again.

[url=https://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/716/bonsaibrowningjuniper2.jpg/][img]https://img716.imageshack.us/img716/2474/bonsaibrowningjuniper2.th.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/202/bonsaibrowningjuniper1.jpg/][img]https://img202.imageshack.us/img202/6566/bonsaibrowningjuniper1.th.jpg[/img][/url]
85 miles west of Chicago
Zone 5a

BonsaiDan420
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Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2011 6:20 am
Location: Louisiana

[/quote]It is pretty thin on the bottom branches, just not filling out. No problem towards the top. The middle branches seem to be filling out better and getting longer. Any suggestions?[/quote]

watch this video about your thinning the same should apply for your situation, watch this guys video's if u havnt already i find him to be VERY informitable

https://www.youtube.com/user/chasnsx#p/u/0/htytBUviJlE

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