occrider
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue May 23, 2006 5:31 am

Emergency Repairs on a Chinese Elm

Ok so my new chinese elm bonsai sufffered some damage after leaving it outside. Apparently the winds tipped it over and the pot crashed into the ground breaking into several pieces such that the root was showing. As a remedy, I put normal soil into a small pot and transplated my bonsai into it. For one, my bonsai is not "wired" through the bottom of the new pot (which is much bigger than my old pot), I'm using a lot of regular soil as opposed to bonsai soil (due to the fact that much of the old soil was lost when my tree fell over), and I'm not sure how to treat my bonsai differently considereing all these factors. Can anyone offer advice as to what I can do to ensure my bonsai's survival?

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

So, what is your "Bonsai Soil" and what is your potting soil? I'm gussing by potting soil you are talking about the soil that you would buy at a nursery.

Provided that the tree was not lying exposed for several days, I would think that it should be fine. I would give it some liquid seaweed fertilizer once a week anyway.

I wouldn't get to worried. Plants are pretty resilient.

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koiboy01
Senior Member
Posts: 171
Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2006 7:49 pm
Location: U K

Hi,
And don't forget to put some pea gravel or something similar into you potting compost to aid drainage.
koiboy01
anyone who never made a mistake never made anything.

Marie1uk
Full Member
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 7:31 pm

Chinese Elm (Ulmus Parvifolia) benefit from a free draining mix due to their fleshy roots. Use a peat based potting compost and 40% grit (Alpine Grit is ideal if you can get it) - mix it together - the mixture should feel light in the hands.

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