Witch is better for inside Bonsai Plastic OR Seramic Pots

PLASTIC
No votes
0
CERAMIC
67%
4
Depends On The Type Of Tree
33%
2
 
Total votes: 6
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GardenerX
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Plastic OR Ceramic

Hello Everyone,

I want to know your thoughts on the QUESTION, Witch is better for inside Bonsai Plastic OR Ceramic Pots.......



I also have a Tree in pot I made, I cut the bottom of a 5 Gallon Bucket off about 3 in' up, then I drilled 4 drainege holes in the bottom, put screen over the holes and I was done..........

If you think thats a good idea or even a horable idea I want to know... TY
signed GardenerX,
Plants are children of Mother Earth and Father Time, as they cling to their mother for comfort today, Father Time works his ways to shape their FUTURE...

Victrinia Ridgeway
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You left out one option.... Makes no difference.

Formal display would generally require a clay pot. Training pots can be anything that drains well. So for you indoor purposes, it makes no particular difference other than what you want to live with. If you are working on growing out an indoor tree to develop it's trunk, then keeping it out of a bonsai pot is generally a good thing. More room for roots generally translates into more growth.

Using a bucket in that fashion is not horrible, except that you need to make sure that you cut a notch into the bottom along the edge if there is no way for the water to escape out from under it when it's draining. Kind of like on a round pot that has no feet, you'll see a notch in one spot along the bottom edge... it lets the water out and air in. Both are equally important.

Kindest regards,

Victrinia
La belle cose prendono tempo... (Beautiful things take time...)

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Gnome
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GardenerX,

My thoughts were similar to Victrinia's I was going to suggest that your fourth option might be something along the lines of:

Depends upon the level of development.

Most of my material is still under development and in a variety of containers.

[url=https://img411.imageshack.us/i/potsui8.jpg/][img]https://img411.imageshack.us/img411/1989/potsui8.th.jpg[/img][/url]

Norm

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:P Indeed... a much more refined option.
La belle cose prendono tempo... (Beautiful things take time...)

FLBonsai
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Do you think plants will absorb any extra nutrients from a clay pot?

Baked clay after all is used as potting mixture and is even good for the skin.

Currently I'm using any pots I can get my hands on ^^

a0c8c
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Is that a colinder Norm? If so, nice!
Home Gardener from Austin, TX; by way of Iowa.

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bonsaiboy
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I think the category rock plantings should also be considered, although with this one it depends on the style of bonsai.
הדמיון הוא יותר חשוב מאשר ידע

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a0c8c wrote:Is that a colinder Norm? If so, nice!
Yeah, that's a colander from the dollar store. If you look to the left two spots you will see a pond basket. I got that one at Lowe's but they should not be too hard to find. I have some Pine seedlings that spent two years in smaller pond baskets and I later moved them up to the colanders.

Norm

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GardenerX
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bonsaiboy wrote:I think the category rock plantings should also be considered, although with this one it depends on the style of bonsai.
very interesting i've never even heard of this type of planting before, bonsaiboy you just gave me a Christmas project :lol: I'm going to have to look more into this and try this one day.... THX for the idea :wink:
signed GardenerX,
Plants are children of Mother Earth and Father Time, as they cling to their mother for comfort today, Father Time works his ways to shape their FUTURE...

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Plants would be likely to absorb nutrition from an unglazed container, but the opposite could also happen...

Clays are colloidal, creating a storage site for nutrition. Clay soils can lock nutrition, so unglazed pots could act in the same fashion. Ancient terra preta often includes pottery shards to help hold nutition in the famously sterile jungle soils. Weak acid respponses from soil biology can etch these nutrients back out from the clay, but their tendency is to absorb and hold nutrient until they are full. Thing is they are not selective and can hold salts just as easily as nutrition (that white grime you see on old clay pots is salts). And if the exchange capacity of the pot is still not full, it could withhold nutrient...

Another good reason not to use ammonia salt fertilizers... Salt build-ups can be phytotoxic (fancy talk for plant killing).

I have seen nursery containers designed just like those collanders and baskets, designed to "root prune" by exposure. Interesting stuff Gnome

Seems I also remember a Floridian guy years back that was creating bonsai simply by stuffing rootballs full of uncut sphagnum; no rock, no pot at all. Worked great for tropicals, especially in high humidity Florida. But no pot at all isn't in our poll either, Victrinia :wink:

Plastic is fine for grow out, as Norm suggests. But a mature tree, one truly worthy of the name bonsai (seven years of culture minimally, by Japanese standards) should be in a pot befitting such a tree. Only fine Japanese pots are suited for a truly fine tree, but mica pots from Korea or some of the red and purple clay from China are great for pines and evergreens. It's not so much the location as the quality and suitability of the pot, but the finest pots I see are all Japanese...

The pot is an integral part of a final tree; if you don't have the container already in mind for the finished tree, then selection should be detailed by the quality, the style, and the character of the tree itself. Some rules do apply; I recommend John Naka's words on pot selection...
The selection of pots is another important stimulus that goes hand in hand with the upkeep and improvement of bonsai. It is necessary to know the relationship between tree and pot, as well as the make, type, color, shape, and size of the pot It helps to have an artistic, scientific, and philosphic point of view to obtain the best overall effect. The comparison of a pot and tree is the same for the painting and the frame. One must compliment the the other, not take away from the other."
John Naka, Bonsai Techniques II
Maybe a little deeper than clay or plastic?

Mr. Naka says later
It is not wrong to use wooden boxes, fiberglass, cement, plastic or flagstone for temporary pots, but not permanently.
Naka-san has spoken... Word.

HG
Scott Reil

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While I have my share of pre-bonsai in everything from cottage cheese container to sardine cans a bonsai is not a bonsai until it is matched with a proper vessel which compliments it’s design and style. While plastic containers are fine for work in progress anything you choose to display, even i f only for your own enjoyment, would benefit aesthetically by a nice pot.
I am questioned almost daily about the benefits of frostproof, gazed, unglazed, stoneware, and earthenware bonsai pots. There is a lot of misinformation out there regarding ceramics and the role it does and does not play in the proper development of roots and a healthy tree. First of all there are two distinct types of clay pots – stoneware and earthenware, glazed and unglazed. Stoneware pots are almost completely vitrified. The clay particles have been heated to a point where they actually go into a liquid glass phase and melt together. Earthenware pots do not fully vitrify but are brought to a heat where the clay particles stick together. Earthenware is like the terracotta pots we all buy and use. They are 70% clay and 30% air. That is why they absorb water and also why they will spall and break when they freeze. Is it likely that they hold and release nutrients? No more than a colanders ability to hold water. I agree with the previous post’s comment regarding salts. Salts will leach from the soil and crystallize in the pores of the open clay body.
Earthenware is more easily broken, stoneware is less. Stoneware will perform well outside in cold climates, earthenware will not. There can be certain benefits to earthenware pots for some plants but the benefits are often covered up with glaze. Nothing passes through the glaze layer. It is glass. Most fine Japanese pots are produced with a clay that has very fine clay particles and/or a porcelain body. They are fired to full vitrification at very high temperatures in either a reduction atmosphere or wood fired. They perform much like stoneware. They are impervious to air and moisture.
There is always a lot of discussion around glaze on the inside of a pot. From an air and moisture perspective interior glaze really does not make a difference on a well fired piece. The real benefit of an unglazed raw clay interior is the plants ability to grip the container. The raw clay has “toothâ€
Chuck Iker
Iker Bonsai Pottery
Batavia, Ohio
www.ikerbonsaipots.com

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Chuck, thaks for your considered, literate and knowledgeable post. The Ohio pottery tradition may not be known to all here, but Ohio is home to many of the oldest, and certainly the finest pottery works in the U.S., like North Carolina is to furniture, or Florida is to oranges. A brief check of Chuck's site will quickly inform you he knows good bonsai pots better than most folks, myself included...

And you know he's telling the truth about the Tupperware... :wink:

Thanks again, Chuck.

Scott
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I've been reading series of blogs by Bonsai hobby-ists in Japan, and it struck me that their trees are usually moved from one pot to another when they're ready to be "seen." Trees are potted for display in "such and such pot" (named pots -- by region, pottery, or artist, I'm assuming) for seasonal enjoyment indoors (usually Tokonoma, though a display space in the entry foyer is also mentioned).

They then take the trees out of the display pots and put them back in "everyday" pots to go back outside (after flowering/fruiting/fall color is over). For mature trees, these appear to be plain pots with no outstanding characteristics but they're still chosen based on color, shape, etc. Sometimes, trees are moved into deeper training pots for further styling. They usually have many trees and only the few "worthy" trees get to be in the special pots for display and only for a short period of time.

They also blog about going to auctions (sometimes regional festivals or street markets in Tokyo, sometimes on-line) to buy these special pots.

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It is interesting to contemplate that the the word bonsai is really two Japanese words; bon= pot, + sai=tree. The two seem to be given equal billing, neh? Perhaps this artform is as much about pots as it is trees? A paradigm to ponder, anyway...

HG
Scott Reil

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In 2007 I had the good fortune of visiting China with enough free time and an interpreter to visit quite a few Chinese Bonsai Displays. At a garden called the “Humble Administrator’s Gardenâ€
Chuck Iker
Iker Bonsai Pottery
Batavia, Ohio
www.ikerbonsaipots.com

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Thanks for posting that slide show. :)

Marsman
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I, too, enjoyed that slide show and have shared it with my friends. Hope some day to go there myself.

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