Melody
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 6:15 pm
Location: Hampshire

What to do with some gifted saplings,

I've just been given about 25 saplings, between 2 and 3 ft high comprising mostly of Sorbus aria ~ Whitebeam, Then some English Oak ~ Quercus robur, Common Dogwood ~ Cornus sanguina, Wayfarer Tree ~ Viburnum lantana and some small Silver birch ~ Betula pendula. They were originally cell grown, planted out in our local museum nursery bed and are now not part of the museum garden plan, They were only basically heeled in and the roots are all pretty small. At the moment I have them in the shade in an emergency bucket of water, I realise they have to be established and make sure they are growing before I can do anything with them, but that's all I do know. If really would appreciate some help and information, even a link with some step by step instructions for transplanting and care of young saplings and a few years examples of root and pruning information. Tomorrow I must wizz out and get pots and compost to keep them in until I can do whatever I have to do, I don't know where to start apart from keeping them alive.

I wasn't going to turn them down, but I wasn't exactly prepared for them, :lol: :cry: Help please :?

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Gnome
Mod
Posts: 5122
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2006 12:17 am
Location: Western PA USDA Zone 6A

Melody,

It is a common misperception that bonsai are developed in small pots, it can be done but greatly slows the development process. A much better strategy with young material is to grow them out for a number of years, either in relatively large pots, boxes, or better yet, the ground. Only after the trunks are developed are smaller pots considered.

I am not familiar with most of these species as bonsai but planting them in your landscape, at least temporarily, will allow some growth and buy you some time to do more research.

Norm

Melody
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 6:15 pm
Location: Hampshire

Thank you Norm,

I have a suitable area in my garden I can plant them in and let them grow for a few years, that also gives me time to become more experienced with the process.

Thanks again,

Melody,



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