mosk1640
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Gold Sawave Cypress advice

I just bought a 10 year old Gold Sawave Cypress. Does anyone have advice on growing them? I plan to keep it indoors under high lumen output flouresents.

Thanks!

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IndorBonsai
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I have a Boulevard Cypress. It is prone to root rot , and if not given enough light the inner and lower branches will die. This is a problem because it does not bud back on old wood. I leave mine outside because I am afraid that I cant give it enough light indoors. If the Gold Sawave Cypress is anything like mine, you might want to keep it outside as much as possible.

Boulevard Cypress

[url=https://img104.imageshack.us/my.php?image=cypress.jpg][img]https://img104.imageshack.us/img104/9265/cypress.jpg[/img][/url]
If your going to have art in your house why not make it living art. :D

Jason

kdodds
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First, looks like someones "common name" list may have had some poor penmanship that will prevent you from finding accurate information. It's Saware, not Sawave. The tree is Chamaecyparis pisifera, a false cypress.

Second, this is one of the traditionally "outdoor" trees that can, with care, be kept inside. HOWEVER, and especially for a beginner to bonsai, this is definitely NOT the best recommendation. If at all possible, Chamaecyparis spp. should be kept outside year round. The Hinoki false cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) is more commonly used in bonsai and has similar care requirements, but is even less amenable to being kept indoors.

mosk1640
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That's horrible news!!! I bought this for my office in which I have pretty high powered lighting suitable for bonsai but now that your saying its an outdoor tree, not sure what to do. (I live in an apt.) Does it have a dormancy period for winter? Should I attempt putting it in hot summer sun?

Thanks!

kdodds
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It has a broad range, depending on who's listing it, as broad as USDA zones 4-9. Zone 9 comprises central to southern Florida and California, essentially sub-tropical, explaining greatly its uses indoors in some cases. But, as I said earlier, it's not generally an easy task and will do better, more likely, outside.

mosk1640
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Gotcha, I understand.. I think I might place it outdoors when possible being that it is now spring going on summer here in NY. Winters will be tough...One thing I have heard though is that these require A LOT of sunlight, correct?

The Helpful Gardener
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Yes on sunlight. As for dormancy, I do not think you will get away without some sort of dormancy for more than a year or two, maybe longer but I doubt it...

HG
Scott Reil

kdodds
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Scott, I've a C. pisifera currently going on two years, previously (years ago) I had one for about 6 years. Can be done without dormancy, but again, touchy.

The Helpful Gardener
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I stand corrected. You can get away with it for about six years... :lol:

HG
Scott Reil

kdodds
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:lol: Yeah, what killed this tree took out my whole collection. I lived on the Brooklyn/Queens border at the time, in an apartment. And SOMEONE thought it would be a good idea to open all of the windows a crack in mid January. By morning, sigh, everything was damaged, irreparably, unfortunately.

The Helpful Gardener
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Sorry to hear kdodds; dead trees are never really funny are they?

My sympathies on your loss...

HG
Scott Reil

kdodds
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Oh, it was a looooong time ago and the person responsible is long ex in my life. The worst is the years put into growing. Mostly all of those trees were required as starter material and JUST getting into some nice shape. I was out of bonsai for a long time after that, a decade, more. Thanks for your sentiments.

mosk1640
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Yea I just recently lost a nice Fukien Tea, partially my own fault. Im still bummed about it.

Alrigth so, not to ask the obvious or anything but i notice the very top buds of my tree beginning to turn a golden color. Im "assuming" this is normal hence the name "Gold" Sawave Cypress. what do you think?

(It's been enjoying 5 days, 8 hours each of florescent lighting and weekends of afternoon sun in a window...soil is moist but not soaked)

Thanks!

The Helpful Gardener
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The gold is a response to photointensity (amount of light); in full sunn it would get much better...

There is a much better gold than the rest called "Gold Mop" and sometimes called the Long Island strain, that is dwarfer with better color...

HG
Scott Reil

mosk1640
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so in conclusion, the more sun or light in general the more gold will appear or is it the other way around?

The Helpful Gardener
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Right the first time...

:)

HG
Scott Reil

mosk1640
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Thanks!!! Ill accomodate accordingly, as long as the gold and excess light isn't a bad thing for the plant!

kdodds
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Less light, more chlorophyll, greening otherwise "not-green" plants. So, generally, the more light, the truer to "ideal" the color will be.

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