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majed
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what type of soil is best for bonsai beginner

hi,
i want to know what type of soil is best for a beginner.how to make it at home.there are lot of stores who sell on internet,because i am living in Pakistan no such facility available here.please help :?: :?:

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uzeyr
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well what i would use is simply soem compost and most importantly for free drainage get some gravel from ypur local petshop and misx it with teh compost more gravel means the tree dries out quicker and so more free draining so each tree requires differently so be carefuk with that apart form that u should be ok with the compost and gravel/grit

kdodds
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If you can get pumice or lava pebbles, and mix in some pine bark, and possibly organic potting soil (indoor trees only on the potting soil) in even amounts, give or take, you should be fine.

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majed
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thanks.
i have pumice available like the picture shown.
[img]https://i588.photobucket.com/albums/ss321/majedadv/moom-natural-pumice-stone-large.jpg[/img]
but i don't have pine bark as i am living in the Gujranwala city of Pakistan no pine here.can i use shesham bark.gravel i have is not round but with sharp edges.
can i use small pieces of wood instead of bark?

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Gnome
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majed,
gravel i have is not round but with sharp edges.
So much the better. It used to be thought that sharp edges would 'stimulate' roots to split or divide and therefore stimulate the branches to mimic the roots and divide as well. I believe that this has proven to be yet another of the many bonsai myths. Still, I prefer irregularly shaped material to smooth ones because they don't pack together as easily as smoother material. The Pumice you have shown would be acceptable if sized appropriately.
but i don't have pine bark as i am living in the Gujranwala city of Pakistan no pine here.can i use shesham bark.
I don't have any knowledge of this material but there is nothing magical about Pine bark, in fact some growers don't like it. Growers on the west coast (of America) often use Fir bark instead.

It is not even necessary to use any organic material at all. If your climate is not overly harsh and you are able to water, and fertilize, frequently you may not need any either. Why not experiment with a younger piece of material and see how it goes.

Norm

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majed
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what you think about almond shell. it can be used instead of pine bark? if you allow me i will try it.

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IndorBonsai
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Since you live in Pakistan it is probably dry and hot , so I would recommend using some sort of organic material that will hold some moisture along with that lava rock in your picture. Maby even a normal planting mix with 80% lava rock will work good for your location.
Basically you just want to find a mix that drains well pulling new/fresh oxygen into the soil and rinses out the bad salts and such from around the roots, and holds moisture long enough the roots wont dry out on you if your at work or something.

Good luck :)
If your going to have art in your house why not make it living art. :D

Jason

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bonsaiboy
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Almond bark might work, assuming its designed to grow plants in. Some types of mulch has toxins in it, and I do know almonds need to be treated before they're edible. T do not know if the toxins have an effect on plants, though. Virtualy any plant safe wood-type mulch would probably work in bonsai soil; I've even grown plants in a soil that contained coconut husks (which are very good at retaining moisture).
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majed
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its very hot now a days in Pakistan about 40 C and direct sunlight can burn skin.i have protected my bonsai in green shades.they really need soil that can hold moist in it.

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Gnome
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majed,

its very hot now a days in Pakistan about 40 C and direct sunlight can burn skin.i have protected my bonsai in green shades.they really need soil that can hold moist in it.
Since your climate is that extreme it would be prudent to include some organic material in your mix.
what you think about almond shell. it can be used instead of pine bark? if you allow me i will try it.
I'm not sure that Almond Shell will serve the purpose. Do you by any chance mean Almond Hulls? I have never experimented with this material so I'm not sure. It might be worth a try.

Norm

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bonsaiboy
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its very hot now a days in Pakistan about 40 C and direct sunlight can burn skin.i have protected my bonsai in green shades.they really need soil that can hold moist in it.
If so I would recommend a soil 50% organic and 50% pumice or other porous rock. That should help maintain moisture.
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