Cuda52774
Cool Member
Posts: 78
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 6:24 pm
Location: Atlanta, Ga

Spring repotting - Scared to death.

Ok, so it's finally time and I'm nervous.

Hell, I don't really even know what I want to do but my trident is swelling and a few buds have already broken and I know it's root bound in some terrible soil.

So here is my dilemma. I've half a mind to take it out of its pot and just plant it in the ground with the soil it already has. Unfortunately, the soil around my place isnt the best for plants. LOL. It's a bit rocky.

My other option is to do a root pruning and complete changing of the soil. The problem with this is that I need it to grow and the best way to do that is in the ground.

Then there's the day to day care of a tree in the ground. We get a lot of drought conditions here in Ga. I wouldn't know when to water it without being able to check it all the time. LOL.

*Caution* Newby freaking out! *Caution*

:lol:

I think I'm just going to suck it up and plant them. It's what they need long term. Now the question is where do I plant them? Maples like full sun or with maybe some late day shade right?

Ugghhh!!! Anyway. No real need to respond to this thread. It helps to get it all out and see my options in front of me.

I'll update later.

Cuda.
Image "Let's put a happy little tree right there."

MOX13
Full Member
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2009 2:55 am
Location: Yakima, WA

Hahaha, good luck! I wish I could help you with advice, but I am so new at this hobby I don't even have a tree yet ;)

I too use this forum to basically talk to myself...... it helps to get it all out, and its a super great added bonus when someone chimes in with a bit of guidance :D

User avatar
Gnome
Mod
Posts: 5122
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2006 4:17 am
Location: Western PA USDA Zone 6A

Cuda,
So here is my dilemma. I've half a mind to take it out of its pot and just plant it in the ground with the soil it already has. Unfortunately, the soil around my place isnt the best for plants. LOL. It's a bit rocky.

My other option is to do a root pruning and complete changing of the soil. The problem with this is that I need it to grow and the best way to do that is in the ground.
If you feel the tree would benefit from some time in the ground then I certainly won't try to talk you out of it. There are a few things to consider though. You should still 'work' the roots, the future nebari depends on it. Ensure that all roots emerge at the same level. Remove crossing or overlapping roots. The roots should be arranged radially, like the spokes of a wheel. Remove any taproot so the tree can sit flat. Check out the pictures [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3423]here[/url] for some basic tips on root pruning. The tree I work on is not anything special but does give a pretty good idea of how to root prune a young tree with the future in mind.

Don't bother putting it in the ground if you don't think you will be able to leave it there for at least three years. It will take a year to get established and will then need a few more to make any progress. If that is unrealistic then a wooden growing box might be a better choice. Plant the tree on a old tile (12 x 12) or piece of scrap wood, this encourages a shallow, flat root system.

Norm

Cuda52774
Cool Member
Posts: 78
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 6:24 pm
Location: Atlanta, Ga

Gnome wrote: If you feel the tree would benefit from some time in the ground then I certainly won't try to talk you out of it. There are a few things to consider though. You should still 'work' the roots, the future nebari depends on it. Ensure that all roots emerge at the same level. Remove crossing or overlapping roots. The roots should be arranged radially, like the spokes of a wheel. Remove any taproot so the tree can sit flat. Check out the pictures [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3423]here[/url] for some basic tips on root pruning. The tree I work on is not anything special but does give a pretty good idea of how to root prune a young tree with the future in mind.

Don't bother putting it in the ground if you don't think you will be able to leave it there for at least three years. It will take a year to get established and will then need a few more to make any progress. If that is unrealistic then a wooden growing box might be a better choice. Plant the tree on a old tile (12 x 12) or piece of scrap wood, this encourages a shallow, flat root system.

Norm
Thanks Norm.

Well, here's the thing......I chickened out completely and just slipped them out of the pot and planted them and hoped for the best.

I did read an article about how best to plant the tree and dug the hole out twice as wide as the pot and only as deep as the depth of the soil the tree is in now (which is surprisingly shallow). I also mixed in composted pine bark into our red Ga. clay backfill to improve drainage.

Really, I just want them to grow free for a few years. I know I'm probably making mistakes but I'm just happy to let them grow and gain some experience in the process. I figure the tree will do the rest in trying to thrive in all this sun we have.

Thanks for the advice Norm. Sorry I couldn't follow it as well as I would have liked but they're in the ground now and I'm way too lazy to dig them back up. LOL.

Pics to follow soon.

Cuda
Image "Let's put a happy little tree right there."

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