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uzeyr
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akadama soil

ok i wanted to repot one of my elms seeing as winter is ending and so im getting ready to buy some of the things i will need obviously the main thing would be the soil im considering akadma this time also since it doesnt look that natural im think i might use a bit of peat or compost any way wat would u guys suggest ??

Kenshin14435
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uzeyr,
As I suggested to SaturnsPattern, you obviously need a free draining soil.
Look here to see what kind of material is used in common bonsai soil. Akadama is on there as well.

[url]https://www.dallasbonsai.com/store/potting_medium_index.html[/url]

Other than that your soil sounds well off to me. If you do not have any organic fertilizers in your soil. Make sure to fertilize when and to what extent is recommendedf for the kind of tree you are looking at repoting.

Take Care
~ Ken ~

kdodds
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A lot of people go with straight inorganic soil and it works well for them. However, with indoor bonsai culture, it is often better to mix in an organic soil. Most "indoor mixes" will contain 30-50% organics. It is my experience that this type of mixture works best in most cases of indoor culture.

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uzeyr
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ok will keep that in mind thanx
oh and by the way when we say organic what do we mean ? is it peat or compost ?

im talking about indoor

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Gnome
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uzeyr,
oh and by the way when we say organic what do we mean ? is it peat or compost ?
I know from another board I used to frequent that folks in the UK sometimes use the term compost when referring to their bonsai medium. In this case I believe that you actually mean compost in the sense of decomposed organic material. So if I understand correctly, no I would not use actual compost or peat in a bonsai soil. Including such material would defeat the purpose of using the free draining mix. If you include materials of differing sizes the smaller ones work into the spaces between the larger ones and impede drainage.

Some growers, especially where the climate is very dry, use some chopped long fiber Peat in their mix to help retain more water. In your situation I don't feel that would be necessary. If you do decide to include some do not use the typical, finely textured material that you normally find in many nurseries, it must be the coarse stuff chopped up a bit.

Most growers use bark of some sort for their medium usually Fir or Pine. I use Pine bark because that is what is available here. The trick is finding it in an appropriate size. Since you will only need a small amount you could easily cut chunks up with some garden pruners. Keep the pieces of a similar size as the other components. At least one size screen of 1/8 Inch (3-4 mm) is really helpful when mixing your owns soil. This allows you to exclude whatever falls through, which is too small.

BTW, you need not go the expense of using imported components such as Akadama. I use locally available materials that don't have to be imported from half way around the world. Visit this thread to learn more about bonsai soil components and and re-potting.
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3422

Norm

kdodds
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I actually did mean compost. Moisture retention is actually more important for some tropical and subtropical species than a completely free draining mix.

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uzeyr
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that is what i thought u knw for a tree like ficus that prefers moist conditions that akadama would dry really fast or it wont ?
also i was thinking would the akadama be good for the larch (pseudolarix amabilis ) i bought a group planting last autumn and i wanna plant them and train them separatley what would u guys suggest ??

kdodds
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Both would work well in Akadama or any other straight inorganic mix. However, with Akadama, watering more frequently and liberally will be required. Because it lessens that workload, I mostly use an "indoor mix", including for Ficus. But, Ficus are tolerant either way.

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