HuSo
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PLEASE SOMEONE HELP (Chinese Elm)

Hello everybody!

I'm new on the forum and this is my very first little bonsai...
I got it as a present and I unfortunately do not know how to take care of it :oops:

I also tried to google it but my efforts were fruitless with so many types of bonsai that exists I'm clearly lost!

Here are some pictures, if you will help me identify it and / or guide me how to take care of it I will be very thankful!

https://img257.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p9170143vt0.jpg

https://img527.imageshack.us/img527/3656/dsc00034dn8.jpg

Thanks in advance for your help!

rondo769
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I do believe it's a chinese elm.There are several posts on here about them and how to care for them.Try a search
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HuSo
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Location: Greece

Hey rondo!

Thanks for the help and for your quick answer. I'm looking through the posts to learn more about the Chinese elm now.

If you or anyone have some more information about them please feel free to post here also...

As I understood they are mainly indoor plants that can be on shadow or sun but what is your recommendation? Should it stay in same place always or should I move it around a bit to see how it goes..

I would like to know as well if I need to prune the many naked (leafless) branches (you can see them on the pics) and how should I water it? how often and how much?

Thanks again

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bonsaiboy
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It is a chinese elm (from what I can tell). There is so much info avalable on them as bonsai it would be impossible to post it all here. You should try a google search, as that will tell you a lot. Considering you live in Greece, I'd keep it outside, though.
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alexinoklahoma
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Agree w/ Rondo :-)

Do a image-search at images.google.com (search for a pic of leaves!) and see if what pops up matches your plant. Also use the search-term of Ulmus parvifolia or U parvifolia. U parv have ~zig-zaggy growing tips, alternate leaves along a single 'plane', like if you laid a branch down on flat surface all the leaves/stems would more or less lay flat without some being on top or bottom of the branch (but it ain't perfectly flat ever, fwiw).

No matter the species, you'll wanna get some of the 'bush' out of the tree / expose the trunk if you want to keep the S-shaped trunkline ;-) And is that 'potting soil' it is in?

Alex

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HuSo,
As I understood they are mainly indoor plants that can be on shadow or sun but what is your recommendation? Should it stay in same place always or should I move it around a bit to see how it goes.
Really no such thing as an 'indoor plant' only some that tolerate that better than others. Chinese Elms are one of the species that can be managed inside although I prefer to keep them outside year-round.

How long have you had it and have you been keeping it inside or outside? Are you able or even inclined to keep it outside or would you prefer to keep it inside?

Norm

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HuSo wrote in a PM:
Well, I just got it this evening as a present from my girlfriend and I want to take very good care of it... But it seems far more difficult then I could imagine...
As i understood it is better the humidity than to be in dry place,thats why put it outside because the humidity it is pretty high today.I want to water it because it is very dry now,but i don't know how and how much it is good?

As well if you can take a look a the picture because I'm not sure what i am supposed to do?

https://img257.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p9170143vt0.jpg

It seems that the roots are going outside of the soil a bit: is it normal?

On the right side you can see one branch touching the soil,as well can u tell me about the "naked"branches"? Should I leave them and if not how to take care of them?

If you have any other advice or remarks i will be glad if you let me know...
Well, I just got it this evening as a present from my girlfriend and I want to take very good care of it... But it seems far more difficult then I could imagine.
It might seem daunting at first but you can do this. The first thing to do is learn to mange it on a horticultural level, the artistic elements can come later.
As i understood it is better the humidity than to be in dry place,thats why put it outside because the humidity it is pretty high today.
I think this is a good move, it is much easier to allow nature to do as much work as possible. If you were to keep it indoors much more of the trees needs will need to be met by you.
I want to water it because it is very dry now,but i don't know how and how much it is good?
Read the sticky thread/s located at the top of the forum for watering tips. In a nutshell, always water thoroughly but then wait until the soil approaches dryness before repeating. A little water often is the wrong approach.
It seems that the roots are going outside of the soil a bit: is it normal?
It's hard to tell from that photo but I don't see anything that seems to be a problem. In fact exposed roots (larger ones, not fine ones) are often encouraged in order to give the impression of age and stability. Google the term 'nebari' to see what I mean. The soil itself, as Alex alluded to, is another matter. Next spring will be a good time to re-pot it in a proper, free draining, medium. Make sure to read the 'soil' and 're-potting' sticky threads as well.
On the right side you can see one branch touching the soil,as well can u tell me about the "naked"branches"? Should I leave them and if not how to take care of them?
You can trim any dead material off but I would not do much beyond that for now.

After the obvious, watering and basic care your next hurdle will be getting it through the first winter. Can you describe your climate? I keep my Elms in an unheated garage for about 4 months from about December through March.

Norm

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On the subject of indoor versus outdoor for the Chinese Elm, I've read a number of places that, within its natural range, it can be found from temperate into almost tropical environments. The thing is, I've gotten recommendations that, if I want a Chinese Elm as an indoor tree, I should obtain a material (seed, starter, or bonsai) that is already doing well indoors or known to come from the warmer areas within its range. This makes sense, genetically, as you'd expect a different clade to exist within a much different environment, already adapted to those conditions where another clade might not be as adapted or adaptable. Even though I have a 60 foot (or so, just guessing really) Chinese Elm on my property, I've yet to do anything with seed or layering specifically because of this.

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bonsaiboy
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Just to add to what has been said all along, there is virtualy no such thing as an indoor tree, and seeing as you live in a climate that the chinese elm can thrive in (they like tempature in the same range as the olive from what I've read), it would do best outdoors.
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