Composting corn?



Composting corn?

Wed Apr 16, 2008 6:40 pm

Should I compost corn cobs and husks? They seem too tough to break down much. Any suggestions?
allenwrench
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Wed Apr 16, 2008 9:53 pm

For the cobs, you'll want to chop them up a bit first otherwise they'll take years to compost down but, the chopped husks are great for creating soil structure as the have a very high C:N ratio.

The husks have a very low C:N ratio and compost quite hot. Make sure that you have a lot of browns (usually in the form of leaves but, shredded newspaper works as well. Though leaves have a lower C:N ratio of about 300:1 whereas newspaper is about 2000:1 so, very slow to break down). Anyway be sure to turn the pile at least once a week but preferably once a day with the corn husks or your compost will go anaerobic on you.

They are great and make great soil and with turning, you will have soil in about a month.

It helps to run over them with the mower first but, they will compost just fine left whole.
opabinia51
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Thu Apr 17, 2008 12:25 pm

Thanks for the help!
allenwrench
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Fri Apr 18, 2008 8:29 am

Hey, not a problem! Glad to help. Have fun with your compost. By the way, i find a pitchfork works best for turning the compost.
opabinia51
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Fri May 09, 2008 3:08 am

I just turned my compost March 21 and found a-l-m-o-s-t completely eaten-up corncobs from last summer. So I'd say they take a year to compost.

I didn't see any corn husks or silks at all. I think they disappeared in something like 6 to 9 months.

I sift my compost and harvest what comes through the screen; the rest goes back into the bin.

There weren't any discernible cobs from earlier; all were at the same stage of decomposition.

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cynthia_h
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Sat May 10, 2008 5:37 pm

An elderly country lady who was once one of my neighbors swore by burying a half dozen old corncobs under tomato planting holes, then covering them with manure and planting her tomatoes. She did it that way for 50 years.

I like to see corn cobs floating through the heap -- I think they help aerate when wet, or hold moisture when dry. In summer, when I'm putting them in there, I try to break them in half first.
bcomplx
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Wed Jul 02, 2008 3:58 am

That's really interesting, I'll have to try that one out! Thanks for the advice.
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opabinia51
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Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:30 pm

I threw in a lot of corn cobs from the ditch near the farmers field last year after he harvested. They were whole but I did try to break them in half. This year as I'm mixing the pile I've still seen them but when I pick them up they break into a million little pieces. So I would consider them as anything else in nature and just throw them in. But just like anything else the more you break it down the less work the compost has to do.
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smokensqueal
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Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:34 pm

Is the cob a green or a brown?
Charlie MV
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Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:38 pm

Brown. It's after the farmer combines it in the fall. I on occation will grab some of the stalk but the it helps when the kids like to play with the cobs then I get them when they are done.

EDIT: I can't forget that in the summer we do throw in the cobs from when we eat sweet corn.
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smokensqueal
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cobs, no composting

Thu Dec 22, 2011 2:41 am

I’ve tried this, works well. To test, I turned the dirt out of a 20ft row for tomatoes, about 10inches deep and placed a single layer of corn cobs in 1/2 of the row. When the plain 1/2 was about 3ft high with blossoms, the cob 1/2 was just over 4ft with many tomatoes about marble size. The cobs act like a sponge holding water and all worms love them. Corn meal (easier than cobs) in the compost pile also draws red worms.
Have put corn cobs and/or meal on the ground near my garden, covered with cardboard or piece of old carpet (keep moist). Lift and pick worms off the ground for fishing bait.
carolohay
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Thu Dec 22, 2011 4:16 am

Corn cobs are a good brown, whole or broken up in your compost or garden.

Dried corn cobs were a staple fuel for solid fuel ranges and stoves.
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