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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 4:11 am 
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Joined: Jun 28 '11
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Location: Western Oregon
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I was kicking around one of my gardens and found this minature rose with something growing out the center.......what is it? Is it the rose bush trying to grow out of the flower?

Thanks


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 9:50 am 
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Joined: May 1 '08
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E~10/M
I think it might be Aster Yellows. This particular disease apparently affects a number of species:
http://www.helpfulgardener.com/phpBB2/v ... 660#150660


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:11 am 
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Joined: Oct 16 '09
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Location: Daytona Beach Florida
Okay, I just read through a ton of stuff on phyllody or the production of leafy growth instead of petals. Most of the time in most plants it will be the disease aster yellows. But in roses, it's a known and documented thing.

This is from UC Davis, IPM online.

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7463.html
Quote:
However, in roses the most common cause of phyllody is environmental stress, such as hot weather when flower buds are forming, or water stress. If environmental factors are the cause, affected plants usually have normal and abnormal flowers simultaneously but otherwise look healthy. When the weather cools, the bush resumes producing normal flowers.

Rose growers familiar with the characteristics of individual varieties can assess if phyllody is caused by disease or environmental stress by carefully examining plants. A lack of stunting or yellowing and good overall growth indicate a virus or phytoplasma likely isn’t the cause but instead an individual flower probably is responding to specific environmental conditionals.

No management practices are suggested other than pruning out individual blooms.



Fascinating stuff.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 2:57 pm 
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E~10/M
ThanRose, thank you for pursuing this matter. Having posted the above, I was concerned that unlike a veg plant, a rose shrub would be a significant loss if Twistedlarch had to uproot and dispose of it. Whew! :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2011 2:38 am 
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Joined: Jun 28 '11
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Location: Western Oregon
Actually the weather here in Western Oregon has been cooler and wetter than normal; we've only had maybe half dozen days where we hit 80. It sounds like the disease mentioned above was caused from heat stress if I understood it correctly.

As for the rose bush, their nothing special. Just miniature roses that we have received over the years as gifts, the ones you can go pick up for $6.00 from your local grocery store. So if we had to uproot them it wouldn't be a biggie.

Thanks
Brian


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2011 11:12 am 
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Joined: Oct 16 '09
Posts: 469
Location: Daytona Beach Florida
applestar wrote:
Having posted the above, I was concerned that unlike a veg plant, a rose shrub would be a significant loss if Twistedlarch had to uproot and dispose of it.


Yeah, me too. Aster yellows just fascinated me with that thread you linked, so I pursued it.


Twistedlarch wrote:
It sounds like the disease mentioned above was caused from heat stress if I understood it correctly.



Yep, from that quoted selection. And apparently that's the most common reason for phyllody in roses, but other environmental stresses can produce this too. It would not have to be weather related. An inadvertent whack with lawn furniture, a half hearted nibble from a squirrel, perhaps a close encounter of the third kind: anything that stressed the bud at a critical point could have produced phyllody.

If all else is normal with your rose, such as the leaves have a good color, and any other buds are normal, I'd leave it alone and just think it was a pretty cool thing to happen in my yard.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:13 pm 
Green Thumb

Joined: Jul 5 '09
Posts: 556
Location: Hurst, TX USA Zone 7/8
You can also see this (in various degrees) in Gallicas.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 7:31 am 
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Joined: Dec 23 '11
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Location: san jose
This has been known to happen if you use to much alfalfa. The growth hormone levels get to high.


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