Advice on fall mums



Advice on fall mums

Wed Sep 08, 2010 1:02 am

Fall is approaching and it's time for those beautiful mums. The ones I plant in the fall don't seem to make it back in the spring. Have had marginal success, but they never make it more that a year or two. Are there certain varieties that do best with fall planting? Or should I just wait until spring to plant them? I end up buying fall mums every year and would like to at least have a few that come back. I do know to plant the hardy mums, not the greenhouse varieties. Any suggestions?
lily51
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Wed Sep 08, 2010 2:03 am

You want to plant garden mums in the spring. That gives them the whole summer to establish a good root system. The foliage will die back in the fall after the first good frost, and at that time, you should cut them back and mulch them heavily.

Fall-planted mums are usually in bloom when purchased, and don't have the energy to devote to growing strong, healthy roots, before they get zapped by the frost. It is common for them not to survive the winter, although a few do.

Although mums are perennials, they stop performing as well after a few years. It's a good idea to start new ones every now and then, using cuttings from your old plants. :)
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Kisal
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Wed Sep 08, 2010 2:12 pm

Mums are easily rooted in water and when they start growing in the spring prune back every so often until July and you should have bueatiful plants come fall. They prefer a good soil mixture and since their roots are close to the surface make sure they get water, do not overwater and you should have no problems. You must water plants in the winter if no rain or snow or else they will die.
bullthistle
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Wed Sep 08, 2010 4:52 pm

.. cutting them back...

Is that so they look fuller .. mine have grown a lot in the last year -- I did not prune -- the flowers are trying to come out .. but I think it will only be on the tops.

... if I am going to propagate with cuttings? What time of the year should I do that??

How far down do I prune??

thanks so much!

Silvia
SkyKero
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Wed Sep 08, 2010 7:18 pm

Cuttings in May and prune down to the crown.
bullthistle
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Wed Sep 08, 2010 7:45 pm

Prune to the crown for winter after they have all finished and turned brown.

To make the plant bushier with more flowers, cut off just the growing tips at Memorial Day and the 4th of July....
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rainbowgardener
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Wed Sep 08, 2010 7:54 pm

I'm getting ready once again to binge on mums. Thanks for all your imput so some might actually make it.
In this part of Ohio you are supposed to keep the buds pinched back until July 14 (I can remember this one since it's our anniversary) and then let them go on to bloom. My sister-in-law had one absolutely ginormous lavender daisy type mum that came back year after year and this worked for her.
lily51
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Thu Sep 09, 2010 6:16 pm

This may not work for you in chillier climates, but I have rescued mums off the dump table in the fall . Past their prime, then very cheap or free. When I get around to it, cut back to a couple of inches and plant. May or may not make it. A mulch would help I am sure. If green shoots show in spring, you should be fine. If not, well, not out too much!

I pinch back up to July 4th or so.
Have fun!
Susan
Susan W
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Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:03 pm

Yeah, with mums, you can plant them in fall, though planting them in spring will make their roots the hardiest when you cut them back in fall.

The reason that you cut back the mums for winter is that if you don't there is more likely a chance of fungal infection and root rot.

Mulching over helps to keep the roots from fully freezing by providing a bit of insulation.

G.G.
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TheGayGardener
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Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:05 pm

Also, around July, I cut my mums back after they've grown a bit. THAT is so that the mums are fuller in the fall.
Questions concerning the garden? Pest problems? Fungus? ID questions? Ask the gay gardener!

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