Basic RASPBERRY BUSH Care



Basic RASPBERRY BUSH Care

Sun May 07, 2006 10:20 pm

We just received some raspberry plants today and have planted them. I'm just curious about basic care- how often to water, how long will it take for them to grow, is this the best time for planting, when should I expect a harvest, ect. If anyone could give me the basic Raspberry 101 guide, I'd really appreciate it!
God bless!
redheadmaiden
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Sun May 07, 2006 11:16 pm

Depending on your climate (ie. How hot it gets.) I'd give them a nice deep watering maybe once or twice a week. Fertilize initially by adding a bunch of compost to the soil then give them a shot of liquid seaweed fertilzer each week.

In the Fall, prune back all the woody grow such that the runners can come up unimpeded next spring.

Generally speaking you want to build a sort of "fence" for the plants (that are vines) to grow up. Wire works but, wood is generally a bit better. As the vines grow up, just tuck them behind the rails of the fence. Maybe two or three rails should suffice.

If you have everbearing plants you will be harvesting in the summer and fall. If you don't you can expect to start harvesting mid summer and that will be it.

After you have pruned your plants back in the fall. Tuck any runners back into the fence then mulch the plants with some rotted chicken manure, grass clippings and mulched up leaves.
opabinia51
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Mon May 08, 2006 4:14 am

Welcome to the forum RedheadMaiden!! Glad you could join us!
I have copied the information about raspberry care that I wrote for another thread back in January for you - hope it helps.

First of all there are two main types of raspberries, summer bearing and fall bearing. If you are unsure right now, which ones you have, treat them as summer bearing until they finish next year, and at least if they turn out to be fall bearing you won't have had a year without any berries.

Fall bearing bushes are the easiest to prune, as you do not need to decide what to keep and what to not. After the berries have all been harvested, cut or mow the whole row down to ground level. They will grow back up, and bear again in the fall.

Summer bearing raspberries take two years to complete their cycle, and therefore, if you were to cut all of yours to the ground now, without knowing if they were summer or fall, you could end up without any berries for a year.
The young, green canes poke out of the ground, and grow over the summer to quite a height (these are called floricanes). In the fall, some people let these branches continue growing as high as they want, and others top them at a more manageabe height (as I do) so that it is easier picking. Topping them also encourages bilateral branches from the sides of the canes, giving you a higher yield of berries.
In the spring, your canes that grew nice and tall over the past summer, but did not bear any berries should be left in the garden. They will now bloom this year, and bear lots of berries for you.

Then in the fall, you will see that you now have two types of canes. (if you just moved in and the raspberries haven't been taken care of, you probably have this stage now). Some are the nice new green canes that have not had berries this year, and some may already be dying or dead, but even if they are not yet, their stem will be brown or a greyish color. These old canes need to be cut out right to the ground. They are finished and will not bear fruit again. You should just be left with green canes (floricanes) again.

Your raspberries will continue this ongoing cycle, year after year.

Most people also use different ways of staking their raspberries as they can get unwieldy if just left. Some put a heavy, tall stake at each end of the row, run a line to both, and then tie each individual cane to this line. This is called a T trellis.

Others place several tall,heavy stakes along both sides of the row (the number would depend on the length of the row) about every six feet. Then a line is run all the way around these stakes, making a sort of cage. The line can be run at several heights, if your canes are different heights. This is call a hedgerow trellis.

Other people just let them grow their own way and let them do their own thing.

Raspberries will tolerate alot of hot dry weather, but while blooming, and especially while bearing fruit, require alot of water. The less water you give them at this point, the smaller your berries will be. Also, if you get hot glaring sun all day, try to somehow provide them with a little shade during the harshest time of the day to prevent scalded berries.

Raspberries, like all plants have their own special soil needs. They prefer deep, sandy/loam soil, although they will grow in almost any soil. The PH level for them is between 6 and 7, and they like a high level of organic matter.

Enjoy your raspberries - they are delicious!! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)
grandpasrose
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Tue May 16, 2006 1:02 am

:D Thank you both so much for filling me in on the raspberry care! I really appreciate the time you took to do so. It will be extremely helpful in months to come! May God bless you!
redheadmaiden
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Tue May 16, 2006 4:55 am

Not a problem! That's what the forum's all about! Feel free to drop in anytime if you have question, answers, or just want to chat!! The door is always open! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)
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I Need Help too.....

Sun May 06, 2007 4:17 am

So, I went to home depot and I saw raspberry and blueberry bushes and I thought, "oh neat! I can plant those and have fruit, that will be fun." But, as I have done some reasearch on these plants, I had no idea what I was getting into. I planted the raspberry bush under some shade in a corner of my backyard. I have NO IDEA HOW TO GARDEN!!!!!!! Just putting that out there as a disclaimer...so pruning and suckers and sprigs and all that terminology makes no sense to me :oops: I guess my question is what in the world do I do with these plants now that I have them? Do I HAVE to have some sort of trellis for them to grow on, or can it survive without one? Can just one bush next to a blueberry bush survive? I heard they like some acid fertilizer that starts with an M (muriatic???). Does it need it now? I planted it last weekend. Is 10-10-10 and miracle gro the same thing? This is becoming more work than I realized....anyway, any help would be great! I don't want them to die, but I obviously am in this over my head......

THANKS !!
-Kelly
Singrkel
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Can someone help me please?

Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:03 pm

I moved into a house a couple years ago, there are many raspberry plants running wild in the backyard by the creek. This part of the yard is taken over by wildlife, etc. But I make paths to get to the berries. I really would like to have all the berries in one spot. I wanted to know if I can transplant them? Or would they die? Also, I had no clue how to prune or anything. I have never done any gardening. So, I need all the help I can get in kindergarden terms! :lol: I read the previous posts, and did learn alot. Can I still cut them back since its almost April? Do I cut them to the ground even though they are huge & have been bearing fruit for many years? What is the green & brown? I bought rootblast for them, and some fruit food, is there anything else I can do to help get a better crop? Thank you so much in advance for helping me out! I never had a green thumb and always wanted one, so I figured this is a good start!!!
Maddi
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Mon Mar 29, 2010 7:03 pm

I just discovered a patch of raspberries starting, where I didn't even know they were. I kind of like where they have decided to grow, so I am going to clear around them and let them have the spot. They grew in a patch of weeds, small trees, brush you name it, it is there. And seems my wild raspberries are always with blackberries, no idea why.

For 2010, I am simply going to clear around them.
Put in posts and some wire to kind of keep them to one area, because they are really close to my garden beds.

And let them grow, when they finish fruiting, then I will remove all old canes, you will know them, they are the ones that really hurt when they poke you. The fresh young canes, while unpleasant aren't as stiff and therefore not as painful. Also the coloring will be different. If you really need to know, just tie a colored string on the ones that are fruiting, then you have a reference point come late summer when you want to remove the old ones. I wouldn't mark them all, just enough to give you an idea what you are looking for.

I don't mind that my raspberries grow many feet, if you simply bend the tips over, and lay a rock on it, they will root and establish, more raspberries, it is that easy to propagate them. And they still have the parent plant to feed them while they grow roots. Later you can cut them apart, after that cane fruits it will die anyhow, but not the roots that you started! Mine will be trickier to do, since I also have blackberries growing in the patch with them. But same rule, get rid of old canes.

If you wear heavy gloves, sometimes you can grab the old, obviously dead canes, they have no leaves on them, and just yank them right out of there. Wait till the good canes leaf out and you will know.
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!
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Ozark Lady
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Want to plant raspberry bushes for the 1st time

Sat Apr 03, 2010 4:14 pm

I've been reviewing the postings about care of raspberry bushes, would like to put some in this year. Sounds like they can be invasive! I don't want to intrude into my neighbors yard. Do lots of gardening with perennials, but never fruit bushes or veggies (other than tomatoes).
I live in Chicago suburbs-- hot humid summers, dry in August, alkaline soil. My thought for plant location was sunny corner in backyard with cyclone fence on both sides. Currently have some ornamental grasses there which I will move.

My questions--
Should I edge off site with something to prevent invasion into neighbors yard?
Everbearing bushes or just summer or fall?
Would current fence be OK for staking or should I do more?

Any recommendations would be welcome. I'm new to this site, so if I did this wrong, bear with me as I learn. Many thanks--Pat M
Pat M
Glen Ellyn, IL
Pat M
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Im so lost

Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:57 pm

I did a post on raspberry bushes, I had some help, thankfully, from
cynthia and roger, but when I click on the email, I cant get to where I can reply to their posts. Does anyone know what I am doing wrong? I am such a novice LOL

thanks
maddi
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help! red raspberry wilting

Thu Apr 29, 2010 7:09 pm

:cry: i recently bought and planted some red raspberries. every morning when we wake up they are standing straight up robust at attention by 11 am they are wilted and falling over. we have watered them sooooo much im worried about root rot.
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d. cripps
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Thu Apr 29, 2010 8:59 pm

Hmm... Raspberries do prefer well drained soil. I'm assuming I see puddle of water there because you just watered? How often do you water? Is it possible that you ARE watering too much? -- as in too often -- and not letting the soil dry? The area appears to be clay soil.

The other concern is the shade it's in. Raspberries like it hot and sunny.

Blackberries can take some shade and clay soil.
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applestar
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