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 Post subject: Bush bean thinning?
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 3:00 am 
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Location: Upstate SC
Hi All,

Question about the Dragons Tongue bush beans in my new garden.

Just wondering since these are sown so close together at 2-3 inches.

Short of a sickly looking plant do these require thinning? If so to what distance?

Or do I just sow, trim out and sickly/underfed looking ones, and go from there with all good looking plants still in the ground?

Also what time frames would you recommend on succession plantings so I have a longer harvest?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 3:17 am 
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I don't thin my beans and they do just fine. Most beans do like very warm soil and I don't seed them here in Camden, S.C. until at least mid April.

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Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 40 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 3:25 am 
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yeah that's about the time a planned to do so here in the upstate. Just working out numbers at this point

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 3:33 am 
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The past couple of years I've block planted my green beans in 4' x 5' areas. A block that size with perhaps 30 plants gives us enough green beans for about three weeks. Green beans are a great candidate for succession planting, such that harvest can easily continue for six to eight weeks. Of course healthy pole beans can produce most of the summer.

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Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 40 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 3:50 am 
Green Thumb

Joined: Jan 8 '09
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Location: Ohio
Alex I couldn't agree more. Beans can be packed tight.
No thinning for my beans either. I put 2-3 beans in a hole, made from the end of hoe handle, so 2-3 plant shoot out of the same spot. They all produce.
I start bush beans early(Late March) and do succession planting(every couple weeks into July). I harvest beans from early June into September.
Like Alex says, a good pole bean will produce all summer, as long as you keep picking.(Try Kentucky Wonder)
The neighbor plants pole bean in April (the variety escapes me), harvests all of them in June and replants, they are popping up by July 4th and he is picking by late August.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 12:46 pm 
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E~10/M
Wow really?! :shock: Ohio zones are 5 and 6 right? I always thought beans had to wait until much warmer so I've never tried planting them before mid-May! (and I'm in zone 6b/7) Maybe I have to re-think my seed sowing schedule... :roll:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 1:51 pm 
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Mine have just rotted in the ground or have been killed by a late frost when started before early to mid April.

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Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 40 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 2:15 pm 
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I plan on starting last week of April-first week of May. It's been pretty warm this year so should be late enough to avoid any problems.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 3:24 pm 
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E~10/M
Right. That's what I thought.... Hmm, maybe you're thinking peas?
I bought 4 kinds this year. The numbers are days to harvest. Should be interesting. I'm planning to direct seed these every week for 3 wks starting mid-March. Our short spring (suddenly 80's in May) means later sowing is usually not worth it -- they grow, then shrivel before they're ready to bear.
Peas Sugar Anne Snap 52~62 2' self-supporting.
Peas Dakota 55~60 2~3' tall. 8~10/pod
Peas Golden India 60~70 6' tall Purple f -> yellow pods
Peas Blauschokker Blue 80~85 6' tall. Red/violet flowers. Blue/purple pods


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 3:39 pm 
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Our pea harvest is similar to yours. They start bearing and within two or three weeks, the weather is too hot for them. Last year I planted two types of sugar snaps. The one with the shorter, self supporting vines was much easier to pick, so will switch just to them this year. I am going to plant two groups of seeds. The first will go out this coming week, and the next will go out in late March. I want to see if there is any difference in the harvest times. I've planted early before, and the sweet peas sprout and begin to grow, but then they get killed back with every hard frost. Perhaps covering with some kind of floating protection might be an improvement. Anyway, the early ones have not appeared to begin producing any faster than the ones that are planted later. Will make my test a little more scientific this year plus will likely cover or mulch to protect the earlier plants from the freezes this time.

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Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 40 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 3:09 am 
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Location: Ohio
I grew up near Akron(northern Ohio) and a guy down the road[Grandpa Hoskings](he was right against a creek and had a system to flood his garden) had 1/4 acre part had late day shade. He planted early, a large variety of veggies, no corn. The whole thing was picked, tilled, flooded, dried, and replanted end of June. He had 2 crops of beans and lots of other stuff every year. Watched him for 10-15 years.
Now in SW Ohio(Zone 6A) I replant beans and onions each year[same spot].
After the neighbor watched me for a few years, he kicked up his schedule and now gets 2 harvests(Half runners). He says they die out and aren't good to let go all summer. KY Wonder pole beans will produce all summer.
Call me crazy for start so early(first group), but I've only had snow kill off the first bunch once in last 10 years. Those 2 packs of bean cost me $1 each.
I'll be planting beans within 2-3 weeks. As they say, Cincinnati doesn't have spring. Just Winter and Summer and Fall.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 3:14 am 
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I just put in some squash seeds tonight, from supper[butter squash]. We know it is too cold for them, but they will pop up in a month and I'll be ahead of the game. Unless the squirrels smell them out.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 12:22 pm 
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E~10/M
2cents, sorry to doubt you re: beans vs. peas. :oops:
Thanks for the good tip. Definitely something to consider.... 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 2:27 pm 
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Location: Ohio
applestar,
No problem, I don't mean to sound rude. I am just blunt sometimes.
Dad really enjoys beans and he would get a double crop in Summit County.
Learned it from him, He says it was Old Man Hoskins that changed his mind.
Since beans are so easy to propogate, I don't mind the work for more results.
Picked up some Royal Burgundy Bush Beans, 54 day variety.
Believe me I'm half tempted to try 3 crops in the same spot.
But, I know it won't produce on the third crop, due to cool evening temps.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:30 am 
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Location: Ohio
applestar,
hope you read this. I am zone 6A
After these earlier discussions, I decided to push the envelope and see what I could get away with.
I planted green beans(bush) on March 7th. They were 2-3 inches under ground to protect them from the cold. They have started to come up. 5 of the little guys so far. I am guessing more of them later. I will start another row of beans this weekend, to keep the succession planting going.

We know I will get 2 crops of beans from that row. The question is can I get 3 crops from that row?
Anyone want to place a wager?
Just trying to have some fun.


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